Educational Cultural Center Check PresentationMichael A. Monteith, CEO of the Peninsula Community Foundation recently presented a $10,000 grant to Dr. Mary T Christian, representing the Barrett-Peake Heritage Foundation for renovation of the Educational and Cultural Center located at 123 East Pembroke Avenue, Hampton, Va.

Attending the ceremony at the Peninsula Community Foundation were Lloyd Seay, Capital Campaign Co-Chair, Barrett-Peake Heritage Foundation, Ross Mugler, Capital Campaign Co-Chair, Donnie Tuck, Mayor, City of Hampton, Sandra Timmons, Secretary-Treasurer and Executive Assistant, Mike Monteith, CEO, Peninsula Community Foundation, Dr. Mary Christian, President and Co-Founder, Dr. Angela Goodloe, Program Director, Dr. Colita Fairfax, Vice-President and Co-Founder, Jack Ezzell, CEO, Zel Technologies LLC and Peninsula Community Foundation Board Member, and Jimmy Gray, Vice-Mayor, City of Hampton.

An edition of "Round Robin" - a program presented by the City of Hampton

 
  - From the City of Hampton's YouTube channel  

"Dr. Mary T. Christian says growing up on Lincoln Street infused her with a sense of community that has influenced everything she's done in an amazing career: getting her bachelor's degree while working and raising children, teaching, getting her master's at Columbia University in New York and Ph.D. from Michigan State, joining the Hampton School Board, chairing Hampton University's Education Department, and serving 18 years in the General Assembly House of Delegates."

An edition of "Round Robin" - a program presented by the City of Hampton

 
  - From the City of Hampton's YouTube channel 
"Dr. Mary T. Christian and Dr. Colita Fairfax are heading up an effort to turn the Hampton home of the Virginia Federation of Colored Women's Clubs into a museum and community gathering place. "

"And that's not all the Barrett-Peake Heritage Foundation is planning..."
By Denise M. Watson - The Virginian-Pilot

The boarded-up house at East Pembroke Avenue and Eaton Street in Hampton is the roomy dream any mom would love, especially Janie Porter Barrett.

Before Barrett died in 1948, the social reformer would likely have filled its three stories and wrap-around porch with children to teach to read. To teach them how to pray, how to hold themselves with a pride that she knew from experience they would need.

The house is quiet now, rust-streaked and dark, in need of a loving touch like Barrett’s.

Two Hampton women have formed a foundation to restore the home in the name of two historic women who lived in different eras but had the same purpose of mothering Hampton’s lost children.

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